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20121205
20121213
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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
of their people here, in this environment, there is little reason to lock at promising u.s., what is attracting money to places like switzerland, that it is not, inhibiting capital forming a and grrwth, we are. this has been developinn under republicans and democratic presidents alike with rules and regulations this is a very unfriendly environment to business. >> tax -- real tax rate for the large corporations, many who pay no federal income tax is 17%, it is not 35% or 30%, that is the tax rate, due to all loopholes. neil: i know, we can get into this argument. the real tax rate in japan now north of 13%, we can go back and forth on this but trend is up here, there are a lot of countries where reversing or slowing there, that is to a businessman looking to expand a good reason to expand. >> let's lower the bar, let's expect these u.s. corporationss3 with their privilages they have been given, as least keep as much money her as percentage -- >> you act like they are doing nothing here. they are hiring people, and growing hire, they have done a well the here, and our thank you to them. >> as we
and be informed in an entertaining, fun environment, in a safe environment, where they can take that, what they have learned from the show and have conversations. >> it is also a tough environment. i e-mailed you before i went to see it. i said, i have a daughter that's almost 11. do you think you should bring her? >> i thought, i'm not sure. when i thought it, i saw exactly, i'm not sure. some of what happens to girls in the world is pretty ugly. >> i think girls 12 and over should see the play. i was just doing the 1 billion rising tour that we will talk about. i was in mexico city. i was with one of the women there that is fighting sex trafficking and human trafficking which $6 billion a year industry. we were just walking down the streets. there were girls, 9, 10, 11, 12, who had been sold, who had been kidnapped, raped 60 times a day. the kind of lives of women, girls across the planet is so varied. it is all part of the same story, girls not having agency over their bodies. >> on the one hand, you have monologues, often global girls telling about horrific conditions like that sexual
. they encouraged more science and engineers. there were not going to create the environment where they would do more work. i am very disturbed and i want to say that one great state inner city is talking about incentives as against creating disincentives. you have to have people who are the imaginative and can look beyond the current crisis. that also has been part of the american middle class. >> i would like to see that -- more of an emphasis on science and math. in terms of k-8th grade. >> one of the great stories of physics, a young physicist who had learned, they started going back to questions of the uncertainty and they became more philosophical. this creates the area for areas of physics in the 1970's. you're not thinking about the deeper ideas and not setting up the framework for thinking operationally. >> do you want to pick up on any of that first? >> only for one thing. i fear that we have a burgeoning student loan problems in our country. it is the only form of consumer debt that has increased substantially. it is by definition subprime. if we look at it on apple's bases, you do no
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. >>> almost a year after his death, kim jong ill still looms over north korea. today they erected eight statues around the city. they instribed his name and started plans to renovate the palace where his body lies in state. here is the breakdown of the cost that we found. so, how is the country paying for it? north koreans don't have the money. they are going to borrow some of it at rates like 40%. that is the amount of food that would have brought enough corn to wipe out the food shortfall. the threats that missiles pose the united states. tonight the story struck a chord with us. anderson starts now. >> tonight the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and ♪ [ female announcer ] holiday
, stimulus campaign. if we were to try that or attempt that in this environment, forget about whether we reach a deal by the end of the year on the so-called cliff, that is what will send the world spending into recession. my thoughts. >> first of all, we don't have the money to pay for the past two deficits. i don't believe weevil have the money for the current spending related to sandy. there's not a tax for that, pretty sure. to the point to have the additional costs which would have to be hundreds and hundreds of billions of dollars, where's that's coming from? unless they use taxes on fuels to be the solution, that, at least, in theory, does not cost the government money. it doesn't mean it passes or have other effects. neil: cost money? >> not economy, but it will not look like they need o spend to solve the problem if that's the way it goes. neil: [inaudible] >> yeah, we're broke. we're turn your pockets inside out, it's over. no money. neil: you got the point across. thank you, both, very much. washington, we have a problem. don't think so? here's it's straight from the real guy
on them or to hear people talking about them, let me do it into an environment and can go paddling kind of go paddling around in there, so defined, i kind of like honey boo boo and on watching it, i still think that's a huge part of the american television experience. and i think it gets sold short we get the techno- ecstatic dogma anytime, anywhere, now. i do still think a lot of american love the enjoyment of escape and be able to kind of roam around the tv channel finding things they didn't know were there. >> michael powell on the future of television, tonight eight eastern on "the communicators," on c-span2. >> we are live this morning at the woodrow wilson center here in washington where immigrationworks u.s.a. is hosting a forum on the impact of the latino vote 2012 presidential race. panelists will analyze the outcome of november's election and whether it will impact immigration policy. among the speakers today, a member of president obama's presidential campaign, dan restrepo, and "washington times" political editor, stephen finan. this is live coverage on c-span2. >> [inaudibl
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reduction or medicare and medicaid and social security or the environment, global climate change, it all comes back to how we receive information. and that this issue you're addressing in this letter is at the heart of your -- >> bill, many of the viewers there are concerned about the growing gap, unequal distribution of wealth and income. they're concerned about health care, concerned about global warming, concerned about women's rights, health, and many, many other issues. if you are concerned about those issues, you must be concerned about media and the increased concentration of ownership in the media. because unless we get ordinary people involved in that discussion. unless we make media relevant to the lives of ordinary people and not use it as a distraction, we are not going to resolve many of these serious crisis, global warming being one. there are scientists who will come on your show and say, "hey, forget everything else. if we don't get a handle on global warming, there's not going to be much less of this planet in a hundred years." do you see that often being portrayed in th
all loss and enhanced that. on some level create the environment in which people can explore literature especially. there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite ridge. we are any feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writers institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers, in columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond, the writers colony -- the writers' groups in hudson, n.y. east and west into western massachusetts, west to syracuse. that is the audience, sort of circumference we work with so when you go back and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connection to henry james and herman melville or bret harte or a little bit further east, emily dickinson or further south, say hi to our old friend walt whitman or edith wharton, when we have this sense of cultural heritage, it helps to amplify the writer's own sense of being part of a
, not fulfil this will go into the political process and create a contentious environment. number four, the issue of gridlock. i will just mention it. the current political regime his work place. the teacher unions controlled education policy. the plaintiffs in the reform, environmental groups that lack energy resources and so on. this is handled the story. these are what economists call rent seeking groups. they control or seek to control the distribution of resources to secure income for the members which wouldn't generate wealth on their own. they suggest economies grow more slowly as much groups will supply and a gain influence over the political process. assuming the resources, reforms this is one reason the u.s. economy grew so loud rapidly, germany and japan took off after world war ii to read these conflicts to strip a network of interest groups that might have blocked the development. obviously we don't want to have the board with interest to the system. but a political people can change in the party regime could accomplish that as the sun. this man is one of the contributions
have to reduce the debt, we have to reduce taxes, reduce regulation, create an environment in which people can go out and create jobs and hire more workers and then we can lower the unemployment rate and this will not be an issue anymore. host: michael tanner of the cato institute, and michael bivens of the economic policy institute. up next, will continue our "america by the numbers" series. the future of u.s. energy production in 2014. we will be joined by adam sieminski and frank verrastro. >> i think writers institute is something that is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to invasion -- envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page, but there is no other art forms so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, joined "book tv" and "american history tv" as we look at the historic and literary life of new york's capital, albany. >> the chiefs of staff had to
and not improve the environment. we need a discussion about tax policy but follow the principle, the greater the gain the greater the burden you bare. many conservatives think that. they are running the debate and totally ahistorical. >> i think this is a really important point about what else favors the wealthy in our tax system. one of the critical issues is the system of deductions. today, the way deductions work, the mortgage deductions or charitable deduction. if you give $10,000, you do $10,000 of a mortgage amount in a year. because of the way rates work as a deduction, it's $3500 if you are in the rate of 35%. and $1500 if you are a middle class family in the 15% marginal rate. it's $10,000. same for two families and much bigger value. it's upsidedown. in a tax plan we put forward, we addressed that issue. we transformed everything into an 18% credit. it's fair across the board. deductions are a way, a big way the tax system favors the well off and well-to-do. it's one of the reasons people are cynical about taxes. conservatives who argue about making the system fair. the best way is
to part time, in the environment where we're looking at 8% unemployment, this isn't about solving the economy. it's very obvious now. stuart: all politics all the time, it is redistribution, it's neo-socialism, forget what it will actually do to economic growth, no, what will it do for my political legacy? >> that's the point. it's advancing the causes of bureaucracy and dependency. so you have people who they no long very a full-time job. they have a part-time job. they need more government benefits you need a bigger bureaucracy to administer it. i'm not a big government fan. if you catch say the euro train on the continent two hours from brussels, that's pretty good, if you want government spending, here's something to show for it. there's nothing to show for it here except the department of bureaucratic compliance. charles: this was a big beef with the stimulus package. they are like -- they built a bridge that took me to stuart and it took them two years to do it. charles: hold on a second. i have to go to nicole, a bank announced they are cutting 11,000 positions? they are re
, environment and essential services and vulnerable populations with smart planning and well-designed recovery and rebuilding tools. we have the ability to reduce the consequences of severe weather. by mitigating flood risk through smarter land use guidelines, building codes and flood protection improvements. the state of new york has requested $9 billion for mitigation measures from the administration. the state of new jersey is seeking another $7 billion for the same purpose. i commend governor quomeow and governor christie for -- cuomo and governor christie for including strategic needs in their funding request. both of these leaders have demonstrated inble compassion and concern for the people who they represent and have been highly effective in their leadership since the disaster began and it may also include mayor bloomberg, mayor booker and many other local officials that stepped up and did the job they were elected to do. i hope -- i look forward to hearing from our witnesses today. my colleagues who i have the deepest respect for and have been engaged in many conversations with them,
. they encouraged more science and engineers, which is fifpblete but they weren't in a creative environment where they could do good work. democracy, as again the founders would have known this, you can't just be a science and engineer in a democracy to look way over the cliff to the mountains and beyond. so i'm very disturbed now to say that one great state university is talking about creating incentives for people to do science and engineering as undergraduates as against in effect creating disincentives for people to do humanities. you have to have people who can look beyond the current crisis. that also has been part of the american middle class, new ideas. >> i agree with that. i would like to see more of an emphasis on the science and math. i guess -- we are going to in terms of particularly in the k through eighth grade so these younger kids can look up to those role models and say is this something i want to not run from? >> one of the great stories, physics in the 1960's, young physicistsous learning how to do problem sets as graduate students, they started going back to answer the quest
it take to get back to the levels of migration that created this political environment created ten or 15 years ago. and by the time her the latino electorate gets to the voting age it's always a question one side or the other very hard to tell, difficult to understand what mobilizes people when they are young. the other question is who are they? what are their values. debate otas people who didn't go to college to have a very hard time winning? do they vote economic interest? we have a good idea of what those economic interests are likely to be. low-income working class many of them were, their parents don't have the money easily to send them to college and public education system is doing terribly with them. the college going rates are up the they are not going to the four year degrees. there are a lot of reasons to assume the economic shape of this. if you take the idea that they are coming -- they are going to come into the politics as coalition players. you are looking at a different kind coalition that rather -- i think we are agreeing. the point here is building of the last thing y
make this whole environment safer for everyone. >> bill: you know what always gets me, if you -- politically it seems to me, this should not be a liberal republican, conservative or democratic issue. >> you're right. >> bill: but as a -- if you look as a conservative and your goal is to get rid of government programs, that cost a lot of money, waste a lot of money and accomplish nothing boy number one on the list would be the war on drugs wouldn't it? >> you want to get rid of $2.6 billion being spenter year. -- spent every year. this is one agency. remember, the d.e.a. was created for one purpose. richard nixon put them together for only one purpose. that is the war on drugs. so you know, i know that we need some of those employees from d.e.a. to manage the pharmaceutical industry. so you dissect that small portion. and you send them over to food and drug. and you get rid of the rest of the enforcement side of the d.e.a. there is a couple million -- billion right there. we can get rid of it tomorrow. >> bil
's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management ♪ [ laughter ] >> oh, sexy girlfriend! >> gretchen: who can forget that scene, a young gedde watanabe playing long duck dong almost 20 years ago in the classic flick "16 candles." >> steve: classic indeed. now he's back and stealing the spotlight from billy crystal and bet mitt letter in the fox film "parental guidance." >> these are parents. they're going to watch the kids. >> welcome to healthy tiger. >> what's that? n no msg, no gluten, no sodium. just healthy food! >> i'm drooling already. >> it's like me! >> my mother japanese. my father chinese. my kids go to hebrew day school, oy vay. >> eric: we're joined by gedde watanabe. it looks fantastic. tell us about the movie. >> well, it's a wonderful, wonderful family movie. it's about raising grandchildren, kids and the problems that go along with it. everyone will enjoy this movie. so
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)